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Notes and Quotes

These Notes and Quotes are intended as a dynamic list of helpful insights into a philosophy of Music, Music Ministry, Musical Communication, and Christian life and ministry. Feel free to suggest other relevant, pertinent quotes by email. [mailto:granteaton@usa.net]

TOPICS QUOTES
Paradigms The following quote illustrates how important it is to understand the context within which a behaviour is observed, in order to fully understand that behaviour. [We are sometimes prone to judge without attempting to discern the context...]

The act of drinking red wine from a glass, may be described as:

"...an act of self-indulgence, an expression of politeness, a proof of alcoholism, a manifestation of loyalty, a gesture of despair, an attempt at suicide, the performance of a social rite, a religious communication, an attempt to summon up one's courage, an attempt to seduce or corrupt another person, the sealing of a bargain, a display of professional expertise..." 

- Ayer, A.J. (1964). Man as a Subject for Science. London: Athlone Press.

Worship

 

Why are we bored with worship?

* This is an excerpt from the new magazine called Relevant, the author of the article is Winn Collier


"God is the one who always has initiated the relationship between God and His people. If worship is primarily something we make happen, then worship is centred on us. If worship is centred on us, it is small - God is small.

And this small God is one we use for our own devices. Worship becomes centrally what we "feel," what we "want," the style we like. We race after worship experiences like addicts race after the back alley crack dealer. Rather than being captured by the Eternal One, we simply use His name for an emotional high. We view God as the one enabling us to "enjoy worship," another perk from the endless giver of good things. We miss the audience of our worship. We forget we stand on holy ground in His presence. We forget we were created for His glory, not Him for ours. The god we worship is one of our own making, and nothing could be more boring than that."

Lifestyle

 

It does not do to dwell on dreams, and forget to live.

[As Harry returns and dwells on the image in the mirror that shows what the viewer most wants in life.]

- Professor Dumbledore in Harry Potter 

Worship

The Reformers saw clearly the significance of the Pauline teaching about justification - that we are freely accepted by God in Christ, not because of our "good works," but by God's grace received in faith. They also saw clearly that God does not accept us because we have offered worthy worship. In his love, he accepts us freely in the person of his beloved Son. It is he who in our name and on our behalf, in our humanity, has made the one offering to the Father which alone is acceptable to God for all humanity, for all nations, for all times. It is he who unites us with himself in the one body, in his communion with the Father and in his continuing intercessions. the real agent in worship, in a New Testament understanding, is Jesus Christ who leads us in our praises and prayers, "the one true minister of the sanctuary," the leitourgos ton hagion, (Heb 8:1,2)

James B. Torrance, Worship, Community & The Triune God of Grace, IVP. 1996, P.23

Worship

 

...the Lord's Supper as the supreme expression of all worship. It is the act in which the risen and ascended Lord meets us at his table, in the power of the Spirit, to bring his passion to our remembrance and to draw us to himself that we may share his communion with the Father and his intercessions for the world.

James B. Torrance, Worship, Community & The Triune God of Grace, IVP. 1996, P.23

Worship

...the discovery that worship is not just something which we, religious people, do to please God, but that in worship Christ himself comes to live in our hearts by the Spirit and draws us into the very life of God. 

referring to entries in George Whitfield's diary...James B. Torrance, Worship, Community & The Triune God of Grace, IVP. 1996, P.24

Worship

We do still worship in church-but only in the sense that we breathe in church. We don't go to church to worship any more than we got to church to breathe.

The purpose of church is fellowship with God's people around God's Word. We worship in every aspect of our lives day by day as we offer our bodies as living sacrifices to God. To confuse the two, as most evangelicals seem to today, is a drastic error.

Phillip Jensen and Tony Payne, "Church/Campus Connections," in TELLING THE
TRUTH: EVANGELIZING POSTMODERNS, D.A. Carson, general editor. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2000, p. 202-203. ISBN 0-310-23432-8

 

"Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about things that matter." -- Martin Luther King, Jr. (Source unknown)

Communication

Am I getting through?
Or am I entertainment value only?
The test is: Do the audience put my message into practice?

"As for you, son of man, your countrymen are talking together about you by the walls and at the doors of the houses, saying to each other,

'Come and hear the message that has come from the LORD.'

My people come to you, as they usually do, and sit before you to listen to your words, but they do not put them into practice.

With their mouths they express devotion, but their hearts are greedy for unjust gain.

Indeed, to them you are nothing more than one who sings love songs with a beautiful voice and plays an instrument well, for they hear your words but do not put them into practice.

"When all this comes true--and it surely will--then they will know that a prophet has been among them."

(Ezek 33:30-33 NIV)

Many musicians are well satisfied to
"sing love songs with a beautiful voice"
and to "play well an instrument well"
But is that all that happens?

Worship Philosophy Donald Hustad wrote the forward to Liesch’s The New Worship. He concludes with one point of disagreement with Liesch regarding the concept of "free-flowing Praise" and it’s "journey into the Holy of Holies" Hustad says this concept of P & W originated with the charismatics and their approaches are "carefully devised according to charismatic theology and Scripture interpretation, and are expected to lead to characteristic pentecostal experiences." He goes on "Charismatic believers have a right to develop their own worship to match their own theology and exegesis, and they have done this well. Noncharismatics should not thoughtlessly copy or imitate their worship formulae, unless they expect to enter the same "Holy of Holies" in the same way. Instead, they should develop their worship rationale based on their scriptural understanding, and then sing up to their own theology"
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(Hustad’s Foreword in Liesch's The New Worship.p.10)

  He is no fool who gives up what he cannot keep for what he cannot lose.
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Jim Elliott.

 

Whoever’s rules are ruling your life, is functioning as god to you.
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Dr. Sandra Wilson

Lifestyle Life is too short to be waiting around for things that aren't going to happen.
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Unknown

Communication What we need, are people who can discern the significant signals from all the background noise.
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David Suzuki

Worship Philosophy

Entertainment

Let the music be redeemed from being a human entertainment, and let it become a divine revelation. Let it never be an end in itself but a means of grace, something to be forgotten in the dawning of something grander. Let it never be regarded as an exhibition of human cleverness but rather as a transmitter of spiritual blessings; never as a terminus, but as a thoroughfare.
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J.H. Jowett The Preacher His Life and Work. Quoted in Lovelace and Rice, Music and Worship in the Church Abingdon 1976, p. 32.

Worship Philosophy The purpose of worship is to elevate, not to degrade. The quality of the music used should be above rather than below the cultural level of the congregation. If the music seems to be 'over your head' the best plan is to raise your head.
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Joseph Clokey In Every Corner Sing, Quoted in Lovelace and Rice, Music and Worship in the Church Abingdon 1976, p. 204

Worship Philosophy

Communication

Our failure to impact contemporary culture is not because we have not been relevant enough, but because we have not been real enough.
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Sally Morgenthaler.  Worship Evangelism   Zondervan 1995  p.30

Worship Philosophy Spectator worship has always been and will always be an oxymoron
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Sally Morgenthaler.  Worship Evangelism   Zondervan 1995  p.49

Leadership People want leadership, and in the absence of leadership, they will listen to anyone who steps up to the microphone.
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Michael J Fox as Lewis in movie, The American President

Worship Philosophy The net result of our "fuzziness" regarding worship is that many of us have ceased to have any objective standard by which to judge whether what we are doing in our worship centres is worship or not.
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Sally Morgenthaler.  Worship Evangelism   Zondervan 1995  p.49

Worship The world is perishing for lack of the knowledge of God and the church is famishing for want of His presence. (1948)
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A.W.Tozer  The Pursuit of God (Camp Hill, Pa,:Christian Publications 1982) p.38

Real Worship In our infatuation with the cosmetic, perhaps we have forgotten that what will both draw and keep people is worship that is not only culturally relevant, but real. Real worship is a lot more than this week's production. It is where we allow the supernatural God of Scripture to show up and to interact with people in the pews.
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Sally Morgenthaler.  Worship Evangelism   Zondervan 1995  p.23

Power of music

Communication

Music cannot change societies, as can changes in technology and political organization. It cannot make people act unless they are already socially and culturally disposed to act. It cannot instil brotherhood, as Tolstoy hoped, or any other state of social value. If it can do anything to people the best it can do is to confirm situations that already exist. It cannot in itself generate thoughts that may benefit or harm mankind, as some writers have suggested; but it can make people more aware of feelings that they have experienced, by reinforcing, narrowing or expanding their consciousness in a variety of ways. Since music is learned in these kinds of context, it is composed in the same spirit. A person may create music for financial gain, for private pleasure, for entertainment, or to accompany a variety of social events, and he need not express overt concern for the human condition. But his music cannot escape the stamp of the society that made its creator human, and the kind of music he composes will be related to his consciousness of, and concern for, his fellow human beings. His cognitive organization will be a function of his personality.
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John Blacking How Musical is Man? Faber, London, 1973. p.107-108

Function of music The chief function of music is to involve people in shared experiences within the framework of their cultural experience.
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John Blacking How Musical is Man? Faber, London, 1973. p.48

Music as Art

Communication

Value of Music

The value of music is, I believe, to be found in terms of the human experiences involved in its creation. There is a difference between music that is occasional and music that enhances human consciousness, music that is simply for having and music that is for being. I submit that the former may be good craftsmanship, but that the latter is art, no matter how simply or complex it sounds, and no matter under what circumstances it is produced.
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John Blacking How Musical is Man? Faber, London, 1973. p.50

Lifestyle It is better to light a candle than curse the darkness.
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Unknown

Lifestyle Keep your feet on the ground, let your heart soar as high as it will, refuse to be average or to surrender to the chill of your spiritual environment.
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A. W. Tozer

Communication I know that you believe you understand what you think I said, but I am not sure you realise that what you heard is not what I meant.
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Unknown

Conducting Some of our young conductors have yet to learn the difference between individualism and peculiarity.
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Unknown

Conducting Musicians aren't happy with nothing to ignore, so that's what conductors were created for.
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Unknown

Ministry

People

Treat people as if they were what they ought to be, and you help them become what they are capable of being.
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Goethe

Mouths of Babes Our 3 year old son proudly told some guests, "My dad works in the Music Miseries."
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G. Eaton

Mouths of Babes Our 5 year old son on his first day of school eagerly announced, "I'm a Schoolboy." His younger brother topped that with, "I'm a Playboy!"
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G. Eaton

Composing Accept our praise, O Lord, for all your glorious power. We will write songs to celebrate your mighty acts.
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Psalm 21.13

Composing Composition is like childbirth, only worse, because you have to endure for much longer than 9 months.
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Sir William Wilton, (quoted by his wife in radio interview.)

Media, Marketing You can't ask people what they want, because they don't know until they get it.
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Clive Walsh, Editor of "Bulletin" in TV interview March '99 regarding marketing research for new format of his magazine.

Christ Alone

If Christianity is dull and boring, if it is a burden and not a blessing, then most likely we are involved in a project, not a Person - a system, not a Savior, rules rather than relationship.

Followership is not a religious thing, a list of rules, a host of rituals, a philosophy of life, or the best choice among other possible lifestyles.

Authentic followers do not live for liturgy or liberation. Following is not celebration. It is not contemporary or traditional. It is not jubilant dance or compelling drama. It is not preaching. It is not praising. It is not obeying or conforming.

It is Christ, and Christ alone.

All the rest is because of Christ and for Christ.

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Stowell, Joseph M., Following Christ Zondervan, Grand Rapids, 1996. p.17-18.

 
  God is calling out, raising up and anointing. Position, education, & tradition is becoming more and more irrelevant. If you're called to preach, worship or anything else, the anointing will open doors even if it's not the traditional ones, or the ones we think they will be or should be.
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- Dee Copley, Hartford, Vermont [Worship list 27/3/99]

Worship

God's Presence

Professionalism

 
When the Church turns all its focus and energies toward the technical and professional perfection of our well-rehearsed music, our crafted sermons, and our tightly scripted services, we can unknowingly begin competing in the wrong arena. We need to stick with the one arena in which no one can compete with us - the art and ability to pull down the manifest presence of God. Technical perfection may win the praise of men, but only the anointing and glory of God can melt their hardened hearts.

At some point point we've got to turn man's volume down and turn God's volume up.

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Tommy Tenney, God's Favorite House, Fresh Bread. 2000, p.112

Worship

God's Presence

 

 
We can remain satisfied with our bland diets of powerless services interspersed with a few "good" services each year, or we can pursue God at any cost. Most of us are uncomfortable with change, but change is a part of what God is about to do. He is redefining the Church and making our religious labels obsolete. I can tell you this much about it: His manifest presence is going to be supreme. That means that it won't really matter who speaks, who sings, who prays, or who does anything in those services - as long as He is there.
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Tommy Tenney, God's Favorite House, Fresh Bread. 2000, p.129-130

Hungering after God

The modern Church is a caretaker or a maintenance organization at best, and a museum of what once was, at worst. Our greatest problem is that we've "stocked our shelves" with the wrong stuff. We offer the hungry our dusty shelves of bland, man-produced religious ritual that no one in his right mind is really hungry for! Empty religious ritual is as appetizing as "blue mashed potatoes" or some other unnatural concoction. If anybody could ever open a store that just dispenses Jesus, the hungry masses would come. Perhaps the reason we haven't stocked our services with the right stuff is because it doesn't come cheap.

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Tommy Tenney, The God Chasers, Destiny Image. 1998, p.68

 

We have to face the fact that we have become addicted to all the things that accompany church, like the choirs and the music. But they are not what God calls "church" and they are not true revival either. I have a strong sense that God is about to strip all that away to ask us, "Now. who loves Me? Who wants Me?" It's time to seek the Reviver instead of revival!.

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Tommy Tenney, The God Chasers, Destiny Image. 1998, p.75

   
   
   

 

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